Dr Dilis Clares Materia Medica

Introduction to the Dispensing of  Dr Clare’s Blended Herbs



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L

Lady's Mantle

(Last edited: Wednesday, 8 March 2017, 8:05 PM)

Lady’s Mantle. Alchemilla vulgaris

 

lady's mantle illustrtionAlso Known As:

Lion's Foot, Manto de la Virgen, Nine Hooks, Nueve Ganchos, Pie de León, Silerkraut.

CAUTION: See separate listing for Alpine Lady's Mantle.

 

Scientific Name:

Alchemilla xanthochlora; Alchemilla vulgaris.

Family: Rosaceae.

 

People Use This For:

Alchemilla is used for mild diarrhoea, heavy menstrual flow, diabetes, menopausal

complaints, painful menses, gastrointestinal disorders, as a relaxant for muscle spasms, an anti-inflammatory, a diuretic, and as a garglefor mouth and throat inflammation.

Topically, alchemilla is used as an astringent for bleeding, to improve wound healing, for ulcers, eczema, skin rashes, and as a bath additive for treating lower-abdominal ailments.

 

Safety:

Alchemilla has been used for many years without reports of significant toxicity (2, 3, 4).

No scientific studies have been carried out for topical use of alchemilla.

Pregnancy: There are no scientific studies available. A 2012 pharmaceutical review assessment describes it as safe in pregnancy 

Breastfeeding: There are no scientific studies available.The above review has no comment for avoiding or for indications for use.

 

Effectiveness:

There is insufficient reliable information available about the effectiveness of alchemilla.

 

Mechanism of Action:

The above ground parts are used. Alchemilla contains 6-8% tannins (3), which are likely to account for its perceived astringent activity (2). A water extract of Alchemilla xanthochlora demonstrates lipid peroxidation and superoxide anion scavenging activity (2). Flavonoid extracts inhibit proteolytic enzymes, including elastase, trypsin, and alpha-chymotrypsin. This property suggests alchemilla might have a role in protecting conjunctive and elastic tissues (2).

 

Adverse Reactions:

Although one reference refers to an association with liver damage no cases have

been reported and the association is likely to be spurious (3).

 

Interactions with Herbs & Supplements:

None known.

 

Interactions with Drugs:

None known.

 

Interactions with Foods:

None known.

 

Interactions with Lab Tests:

None known

 

Interactions with Diseases or Conditions:

None known

 

Dosage/Administration:

Oral: For diarrhoea, a typical dose is one cup tea, prepared by steeping 1-4 grams above ground parts in boiling water for 10 minutes and then straining (3), used up to three times per day between meals. The average amount used per day is 5-10 grams. Equivalent preparations can also be used (1). Diarrhoea persisting for more than 3-4 days should be medically evaluated (3).

Topical: No typical dosage.

 

Specific References: LADY’S MANTLE

1. Blumenthal M, ed. The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Trans. S. Klein. Boston, MA: American Botanical Council, 1998.

2. The Review of Natural Products by Facts and Comparisons. St. Louis, MO: Wolters Kluwer Co., 1999.

3. Wichtl MW. Herbal Drugs and Phytopharmaceuticals. Ed. N.M. Bisset. Stuttgart: Medpharm GmbH Scientific Publishers, 1994.

4. McGuffin M, Hobbs C, Upton R, Goldberg A, eds. American Herbal Products Association's Botanical Safety Handbook. Boca Raton,FL: CRC Press, LLC 1997


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